Books and Book Chapters

In this section, you will find CMP-related books or sections of books. Some report on studies that specifically investigated or described some aspect of CMP. Others investigated more general questions (for example, how do teachers launch tasks in a way that supports student learning later in the lesson?) and used CMP classrooms as the context for the research. Some books or book chapters discuss other ideas in mathematics education, drawing on the CMP curriculum in various ways.


Updated July, 2015

Anderson, N. C. (2008). Walk the line: Making sense of y = mx + b. In C. E. Greenes & R.Rubenstein (Eds.), Algebra and algebraic thinking in school mathematics, 70th yearbook(pp. 233-246). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Artzt, A. F., & Curcio, F. R. with Sultan, A. & Wachter, T. (2003). Rethinking secondary mathematics teacher preparation. In D. Kaufman, D. M. Moss, & T. A. Osborn (Eds.), Beyond the boundaries: A transdisciplinary approach to learning and teaching (pp. 69- 80). Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.

Ben-Chaim, D., Keret, Y., & Ilany, B-S. (2012). Ratio and proportion: Research and teaching in mathematics teachers’ education (pre- and in-service mathematics teachers of elementary and middle school classes). Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense Publishers.

Ben-Zvi, D. (2004). Reasoning about data analysis. In D. Ben-Zvi & J. B. Garfield (Eds.), The challenge of developing statistical reasoning, literacy and thinking (pp. 121-146). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.

Breyfogle, M. L., McDuffie, A. R., & Wohlhute, K. A. (2010). Developing curricular reasoning for grades pre-K-12 mathematics instruction. In R. Reys & B. Reys (Eds.), K-12 mathematic curriculum: Issues, trends, and future directions, 72nd yearbook (pp. 307- 320). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Chappelle, M. (2003). Keeping mathematics front and center: Reaction to middle-grades curriculum projects research. In S. Senk & D. Thompson (Eds.), Standards-based school mathematics curricula: What are they? What do students learn? (pp. 285- 298). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum

Cai, J., Moyer, J. C., Wang, N., & Nie, B. (2011). Examining students’ algebraic thinking in a curricular context: A longitudinal study. In J. Cai & E. Knuth (Eds.), Early algebraization: A global dialog from multiple perspectives (pp. 161-186). New York: Springer.

Chval, K., Chávez, Ó., Reys, B., & Tarr, J. (2009). Considerations and limitations related to conceptualizing and measuring textbook integrity. In J.T Remillard, B. A Herbel-Eisenmann, & G.M Lloyd (Eds.), Mathematics teachers at work: Connecting curriculum materials to classroom instruction (Studies in Mathematical Thinking and Learning Series, A. Schoenfeld, Ed.) (pp. 70-84). New York: Routledge.

Fey, J. T., & Philips, E. D. (2005). A course called Algebra 1. In C. Greenes & C. Findell (Eds.), Developing students’ algebraic reasoning abilities (pp. 4-16). Lakewood, CO: National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics.

Friel, S. N. (1998). Teaching statistics: What’s average? In L. J. Morrow & M. J. Kenney (Eds.), The Teaching and Learning of Algorithms in School Mathematics, 60th yearbook (pp. 208-217). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Goodell, J. E., & Parker, L. H. (2001). Creating a connected, equitable mathematics classroom: Facilitating gender equity. In B. Atweh, H. Forgasz, & B. Nebres (Eds.), Sociocultural research on mathematics education: An international perspective (pp. 411- 431). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Herbel-Eisenmann, B. A., & Phillips, E. (2008). Analyzing student work: A context for connecting and extending algebraic knowledge for teachers. In C. E. Greenes & R. Rubenstein (Eds.), Algebra and algebraic thinking in school mathematics, 70th yearbook (pp. 295-311). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Hwang, S., Cai, J., Shih, J., Moyer, J. C., Wang, N., & Nie, B. (2015). Longitudinally investigating the impact of curricula and classroom emphases of the algebra learning of students of different ethnicities. In Large-Scale Studies in Mathematics Education (pp. 45–60). doi:10.1007/978-3-319-07716-1

ABSTRACT: Classrooms in the United States are becoming increasingly ethnically diverse. However, disparities in the mathematics achievement of different ethnic groups remain a persistent challenge (Lubienski & Crockett, 2007). Although there was about a 10 % reduction in the eighth-grade White-Hispanic mathematics achievement gap on the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), since 2009 there have been no reductions in any of the other White-ethnic mathematics gaps at either grades 4 or 8 (NCES, 2012). Since teaching and learning are cultural activities, students with different ethnic and cultural backgrounds may respond differently to the same curriculum. Given the development and implementation of curricula based on the Standards documents developed by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM, 1989, 2000), a key question about curriculum reform is: How does the use of a Standards-based curriculum impact the learning of students of color as compared to White students? The purpose of this study is to use the data from a longitudinal project to explore this research question. We begin by describing the larger longitudinal project of which this study is a part.

Johanning, D. I., & Keusch, T. (2004). Teaching to develop students as learners. In R. N. Rubenstein (Eds.), Perspectives on the Teaching of Mathematics, 66th yearbook. Reston: VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Johanning, D. I. (2010). Designing curricula to grow and extend mathematical knowledge. In R. Reys & B. Reys (Eds.), K-12 mathematic curriculum: Issues, trends, and future directions, 72nd yearbook (pp. 171-180). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Kasmer, L., & Kim, O. K. (2011). Using prediction to motivate personal investment in problem solving. In D. Brahier (Ed.), Motivation and disposition: Pathways to learning mathematics, 73rd yearbook. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Knuth, E. J., Choppin, J. M., & Bieda, K. (2009). Middle school students’ production of mathematical justification. In D. Stylianou, M. Blanton, & E. Knuth (Eds.), Teaching and learning proof across the grades: A K-16 perspective (pp. 153-170). New York City, NY: Taylor and Francis.

Lappan, G., & Bouck, M. K. (1998). Developing algorithms for adding and subtracting fractions. In L. J. Morrow & M. J. Kenney (Eds.), The Teaching and Learning of Algorithms in School Mathematics, 60th yearbook (pp. 183-197). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Lappan, G., & Phillips, E. (1998). Teaching and learning in the Connected Mathematics Project. In L. Leutzinger (Ed.), Mathematics in the Middle. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Lappan, G., Phillips, E. D., & Fey, J. T. (2007). The case of Connected Mathematics. In C. R. Hirsch (Ed.), Perspectives on the design and development of school mathematics curricula (pp. 67-79). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Li, Y., & Lappan, G. (2014). Mathematics curriculum in school education. Springer.

Lloyd, G. M. (2006). Using K-12 mathematics curriculum materials in preservice teacher education: Rationale, strategies, and teachers' experiences. In K. Lynch-Davis, & R. L. Rider (Eds.), The work of mathematics teacher educators: Continuing the conversation (pp. 11-27). San Diego, CA: Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators.

Lubienski, S. T. (1997). Class matters: A preliminary exploration. In J. Trentacosta, & M. J. Kenney (Eds.), Multicultural and gender equity in the mathematics classroom, the gift of diversity, 59th Yearbook (pp. 46-59). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

ABSTRACT: As a researcher-teacher, I examined 7th-graders' experiences with problem-centered curriculum and pedagogy, focusing on SES differences in students' reactions to learning mathematics through problem solving. Although higher SES students tended to display confidence and solve problems with an eye toward the intended mathematical ideas, the lower SES students preferred more external direction and sometimes approached problems in a way that caused them to miss their intended mathematical points. An examination of sociological literature revealed ways in which these patterns in the data could be related to more than individual differences in temperament or achievement among the children. I suggest that class cultural differences could relate to students' approaches to learning mathematics through solving open, contextualized problems.

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (2000). Principles and standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (1995). Assessment standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (1991). Curriculum and evaluation standards for school mathematics. Professional standards for teaching mathematics. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. (1989). Curriculum and evaluation standards for school mathematics. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Phillips, E. & Lappan, G. (1998). Algebra: The first gate. In L. Leutzinger (Ed.), Mathematics in the Middle (pp. 10-19). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Remillard, J. T., Herbel-Eisenmann, B. A., & Lloyd, G. M. (2008). Perspectives on teachers' use of mathematics curriculum materials. New York, NY: Routledge.

Rickard, A. (1998). Conceptual and procedural understanding in middle school mathematics. In L. Leutzinger (Ed.), Mathematics in the Middle. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Ridgeway, J. E., Zawojewski, J. S., Hover, M. N., & Lambdin, D. V. (2003). Student attainment in the Connected Mathematics Curriculum. In S. L. Senk & D. R. Thompson (Eds.) Standards-based school mathematics curricula: What are they? What do students learn? (pp. 193-224). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Schoenfeld, A., Burkhardt, H., Daro, P., Ridgeway, J., Schwartz, J., & Wilcox, S. (1999). Balanced Assessment: Middle Grades Assessment. New York, NY: Dale Seymour Publications.

Shute, V. J., Graf, E. A., & Hansen, E. (2005). Designing adaptive, diagnostic math assessments for individuals with and without visual disabilities. In L. PytlikZillig, M. Bodvarsson, & R. Bruning (Eds.), Technology-based education: Bringing researchers and practitioners together (pp. 169–202). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.

The El Barrio-Hunter College PDS Partnership Writing Collective. (2009). On the unique relationship between teacher research and commercial mathematics curriculum development. In J. T. Remillard, B. A. Herbel-Eisenmann, & G. M. Lloyd (Eds.), Mathematics teachers at work: Connecting curriculum materials and classroom instruction. London: Routledge.

Zawojewski, J. S., Ridgway, J., Hoover, M. N., & Lambdin, D. V. (2002). The Connected Mathematics curriculum: Intentions, experiences and performance. In S. L. Senk & Denisse R. Thompson (Eds.), Standards oriented school mathematics curricula: What does the research say about student outcomes? Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum